Suzana Wade, Principal of Locate Property, presents the latest insights into Brisbane rental properties located within the greater Queensland market amid the ongoing housing crisis.

Recent data from property research group Proptrack has unveiled a staggering trend: rental properties in Queensland are capturing an overwhelming interest, with more than 120 inquiries per property on average. Notably, the top 10 properties attracting the highest number of inquiries, as reported on realestate.com, are all nestled within Brisbane.

Of these Brisbane rental properties, a residence situated in Bowen Hills, an inner-city suburb with a median rent of $520, garnered a notable 127 inquiries, showcasing the high demand in prime locations.

Interestingly, the fervor for properties extends beyond the city center, with suburbs like Loganlea, Richlands, Berrinba, and Doolandella each receiving over 100 inquiries for individual properties. Notably, both West Ipswich and Ellen Grove saw a considerable influx of around 120 inquiries per property.

The classification of inquiries encompassed engagements with real estate agents or interactions with the property advertisements, according to the data.

This surge in demand doesn’t come as a surprise to locals like Clayfield resident Shoshana Huppert, who faced numerous rejections for rental applications in the previous year. Huppert shared her experience of settling for a townhouse with friends due to prior rejections, highlighting issues with its maintenance and cleanliness.

Huppert discussed her ordeal and the difficulties she had finding suitable housing, stating that she had initially wanted to live independently but had to compromise because of cost. Eventually, she found a rental in Clayfield, opting to live with multiple roommates to navigate the competitive rental landscape.

Proptrack’s figures reinforce the tight vacancy rate in Brisbane, standing at a mere 0.86 percent. Senior economist Eleanor Creagh from Proptrack emphasized the persistence of these conditions, indicating an unlikelihood of immediate relief for renters in the foreseeable future. Creagh stressed the pressing need for an increase in rental property supply as a sustainable solution to the crisis.

Expanding the scope, CoreLogic’s data shed light on more affordable rental options within a 20-kilometer radius of Brisbane’s city center, showcasing areas like Ipswich, Logan, and Beaudesert with comparatively lower median rents for both houses and units.

Capitalizing on this trend, Eliza Owen, Head of Research at CoreLogic, highlighted the overall spike in capital city rents across Australia, attributing it to factors like limited stock availability and shifts in population movements between urban and regional areas. Owen pointed out the increasing attractiveness of previously overlooked suburbs, now experiencing heightened rental demand from professionals working or studying in city centers.

These statistics for Brisbane rental properties paint a vivid picture of the intensifying rental landscape, urging stakeholders to consider sustainable solutions to address the pressing housing challenges faced by renters across Queensland.